CatalystCon West Special Events and Entertainment

 CCON West 2013, Press Release  Comments Off on CatalystCon West Special Events and Entertainment
Sep 122013
 

Dee Dennis Announces Special Events
and Sponsor Offerings for September Conference

With CatalystCon West only two weeks away, creator Dee Dennis is thrilled to announce the entertainment programming and special events that will take place during at the Woodland Hills, CA sexuality conference September 27-29. Created to inspire exceptional converstaions about sexuality, CatalystCon will feature 40 sessions and panel discussions on sexuality-based topics such as sex-positive parenting, progressive swinging, sexuality activism, political organizing and sex and the media.

However, the fun starts even before the conference officially begins with the sold out “Go West & Get Wet” Factory Tour. Wet International will pick up pre-registered attendees in their “Wet Party Bus” and bring them to their factory in Valencia for a light breakfast and tour of the facilities.

There are also two informal pre-conference events on Friday evening. The “Shy/Newbie Get-together” is designed for attendees to meet each other in a low-key, low-pressure environment and the Private Sex Worker Meet & Mingle is hosted by CatalystCon’s sex worker liasions and open only to current and former sex workers. More information on both of these events may be found at catalystcon.com/schedule/meetups.

The conference weekend officially kicks off with an Opening Reception and Keynote Address on Friday evening. The CatalystCon Exhibitors Hall will also open on Friday evening and remain open throughout the weekend, giving attendees a chance to visit with all the exhibiting sponsors. Exhibiting sponsors include ANEROS, Sportsheets, Wicked Sensual Care Collection, Wicked Pictures, Crave, Nature Labs, Slixa, Tantus, Vibratex, Wet International, We-Vibe, and Sexquire. Information about all of sponsors may be found at catalystcon.com/sponsor/sponsors-west.

Attendees can enjoy complimentary coffee and snacks in the Exhibitors Hall courtesy of Hospitality Sponsors Wicked Sensual Care Collection and Wicked Pictures on Saturday and Sunday. Platinum sponsor ANEROS has invited CatalystCon West attendees to visit the ANEROS Lounge, meet the team and learn more about their product line and Crave is offering attendees the chance to see how their Duet vibrators are made at one of their Build-a-Vibe workshops. Many of the sponsors will also be raffling off prizes from their collections to support the Center for Sex and Culture and the Joycelyn Elders Chair in Sexual Health Education.

Meanwhile, just outside the Exhibitors Hall in the Grand Ballroom Foyer, Stories Books & Cafe will be selling books and hosting book signings with CatalystCon speakers, and Davis from Sexquire will be offering complimentary legal, accounting, tax and other business consultations. More information on all of our Sponsor Events may be found at catalystcon.com/schedule/exhibitors.

“CatalystCon has always been about more than just sessions, but I am thrilled that we were able to expand the experience for our attendees even further,” said Dennis. “The sponsors have really gone beyond the concept of typical exhibition and I know everyone is going to love it.”

Author, sex educator and radio host Tristan Taormino will be bringing her weekly radio show, Sex Out Loud, to CatalystCon. She will be recording interviews with conference speakers in front of a live studio audience throughout the weekend. Attendees are invited to join the audience on a first-come, first-served basis.

“CatalystCon brings together a vibrant, active group of sex-positive people from all different communities and industries,” said Taormino.”It’s an exciting event that I just can’t miss!” More information on Sex Out Loud at CatalystCon may be found at catalystcon.com/schedule/special-events.

This conference also marks an important milestone for Gold sponsor Sportsheets, who celebrates their 20th anniversary this year. They have invited CatalystCon attendees to explore and experience their products in the Sportsheets Discovery Center all weekend. Sportsheets personnel will be on hand to answer questions and demonstrate how some of their most popular products work, like the Sportsheets bondage bed and the Door Jam Sex Sling.

Attendees are also invited to join the Wicked team Saturday evening in the Wicked Sensual Suite for champagne and light snacks while experiencing a sampling of the critically acclaimed Wicked Sensual Care Collection and previewing the newest jessica drake Guide to Wicked Sex and Wicked Passions films. Attendees can relax, refresh and get ready for the Saturday evening entertainment.

Metis Black of Tantus and Tom Stewart of Sportsheets have teamed up to sponsor and host CatalystCon Game Night: Sexy Trivia. Black and Stewart will challenge attendees’ knowledge of all things sexy as they compete for fun prizes and bragging rights. “For that night we will be the Sex Ed Capital of the World,” said Black, President of Tantus Inc. “It is going to be so much fun.” Game Night is followed by Bawdy Storytelling, America’s original sex + storytelling show, hosted by Dixie De La Tour. Find out more about both events at catalystcon.com/schedule/entertainment.

CatalystCon West takes place at the Warner Center Marriott in Woodland Hills, CA. Registration is open at catalystcon.com/register.

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Speaker Spotlight: Ruby Ryder

 CCON West 2013, Speaker Spotlight  Comments Off on Speaker Spotlight: Ruby Ryder
Sep 122013
 

Ruby Ryder is presenting The “Ass Panel”: The Ins and Outs of Anal Pleasure. Check out Ruby’s bio here.

 

Ruby RyderHow do you see yourself as a catalyst for change?

I am working hard to encourage more awareness, understanding and acceptance of a largely misunderstood sexual activity; pegging. My travels with this goal in mind have found me working towards more sex-positive attitudes everywhere as well as doing everything I can to basically encourage more communication in bed!

Who or what was a catalyst for you?

Dan Savage. I listened to a podcast where he was encouraging a young woman to embrace her kinks. He told her that there are plenty of websites out there for kinky people to find others with similar interests. He also told her that kinky interests don’t just go away, so it’s best to not only accept them, but embrace them and have some fun. It was like he was talking to me.

What do you feel are some of the biggest challenges or concerns facing us in the field of sexuality right now?

Well politically, we have the whole war on women thing happening and that seems like a constant battle lately. But what concerns me more is the inaccurate portrayal of sex trafficking, and the intentional widening of the definition to mislead the public about what is really happening. That and the basic problem of sex work being illegal – we need more progressive ideas and some creative changes there.

On a more personal level, I’d love to have a magic wand that enabled everyone to talk about sex freely and openly, without stigma or shame, whether that be with their partners or anyone, really. Because until that happens, many other sex-positive dominos will not fall. If we can’t even talk about the problems facing the field of sexuality because the general public finds it too uncomfortable, how are we to make any progress?

What do you feel are some of the most important/valuable positive changes that have been made in the world of sexuality in the past year?

Hands down the Supreme Court decision on DOMA and Prop 8. Until everyone is automatically granted the right to love and marry whomever they want all across the United States, we have more work to do. Those SCOTUS decisions were tremendous victories.

Why do you feel it is important to bring the topic of your session, The “Ass Panel”: The Ins and Outs of Anal Pleasure, to CatalystCon West?

I feel the topic of pegging and prostate pleasure is a much misunderstood sleeper in the world of sexuality. Not only are there health benefits, but the potential for reviving sexually stale partnerships, men discovering orgasms equivalent to women’s G-spot orgasms and a marked deepening of a couple’s intimacy is without compare.

Share one unknown (or little known) fact about yourself.

I live on a 12 acre horse ranch in the hills of Ventura, CA, and hear occasional distant whinnying all hours of the day and night.

 

Learn more about all our amazing speakers here. Register for CatalystCon West here.

Speaker Spotlight: Michael Aaron

 CCON West 2013, Speaker Spotlight  Comments Off on Speaker Spotlight: Michael Aaron
Sep 102013
 

Michael Aaron, PhD is presenting Sex Positive Therapy with Sexual Minorities. Check out Michael’s bio here.

 

Michael AaronHow do you see yourself as a catalyst for change?

As a sex therapist, I help my clients to accept their sexualities and improve their sex lives. As a writer and speaker, I can reach a broader audience and plant some seeds of change farther and wider.

Who or what was a catalyst for you?

I am motivated both personally and professionally. Coming to New York City at the age of 20 and immediately gravitating to several underground nightlife scenes, I spent my young adulthood exploring my identity through sexual exploration. Sex for me is a source of creativity, energy, and connectedness. As a therapist, I work with people who are cut off from this potential due to internalized shame and/or social stigma. So my life’s work is to help people access these aspects of themselves to which they have been previously denied.

What do you feel are some of the biggest challenges or concerns facing us in the field of sexuality right now?

Human ignorance, fear of change, authoritarianism and dogma, the Christian Right.

What do you feel are some of the most important/valuable positive changes that have been made in the world of sexuality in the past year?

Obviously the repeal of DOMA, the legalization of same sex marriages in a bunch of states, the changes in the DSM-V which depathologize paraphilias.

Why do you feel it is important to bring the topic of your session, Sex Positive Therapy with Sexual Minorities , to CatalystCon West?

I’m speaking with my colleague Winston Wilde about sex-positive therapy with sexual minorities. That’s a pretty big umbrella, but I think the main point we will be making is that except for a small minority of problematic behaviors, the vast majority of sexual behavior is normal and healthy. Unfortunately, a lot of people are troubled by their sexualities for no good reason except for the negative crap that they learned, so a large chunk of my work as a therapist is to help people to depathologize and accept their sexualities as a unique aspect of themselves.

Share one unknown (or little known) fact about yourself.

I have some kink-related tattoos on various parts of my body, but you are going to have to find out for yourself exactly where.

 

Learn more about all our amazing speakers here. Register for CatalystCon West here.

Speaker Spotlight: Tomas Moniz

 CCON West 2013, Speaker Spotlight  Comments Off on Speaker Spotlight: Tomas Moniz
Sep 052013
 

Tomas Moniz is presenting Talking the Sex-Positive Walk. Check out Tomas’ bio here.

 

tomas monizHow do you see yourself as a catalyst for change?

I see helping to begin and/or push the conversation around parenting from a safe, consumer based narrative that tends to dominate mainstream media to a more vulnerable, risk taking conversation between parents and parent allies about issues such racism, environmentalism, and specifically related to this event sexuality. That has been a source of excitement and change in my life personally but also in a larger community of parents and allies hoping to create a better strong more equitable world for all of us!

Who or what was a catalyst for you?

I often say that becoming a parent radicalized me; as a 20 year old young man, I was forced to begin the process of considering what kind of family I wanted to be a part of, what kind of relationship with my partner I wanted, how to raise my children in light of all issues that impact their lives: classism, racism, sexism. Becoming a parent forced me to address those issues head on.

What do you feel are some of the biggest challenges or concerns facing us in the field of sexuality right now?

There are sadly so many issues, and I’ll let some of the other amazing presenters address them, but for me raising kids in such a sex negative culture as they enter into their sexual identities in the early teen years. As a parent I am trying to address proactively issues of sexuality while also trying to confront cultural shaming and guilt they are bombarded with around their bodies and desires.

What do you feel are some of the most important/valuable positive changes that have been made in the world of sexuality in the past year?

The teaming up of Rad Dad and Airial Clark’s The Sex Positive Parent!

Why do you feel it is important to bring the topic of your session, Talking the Sex-Positive Walk, to CatalystCon West?

One of my goals with creating a zine on parenting was to build community, to share stories, to remind myself that so many others have experienced this stuff before. So I am hoping to meet more radical parents.

Share one unknown (or little known) fact about yourself.

I will have a poetry reading the Thursday before the conference with a bunch of amazing LA bases zinesters and writers!

 

Learn more about all our amazing speakers here. Register for CatalystCon West here.

Speaker Spotlight: Cunning Minx

 CCON West 2013, Speaker Spotlight  Comments Off on Speaker Spotlight: Cunning Minx
Sep 032013
 

Cunning Minx is presenting How to be a Sex Positive Educator (When You Still Love Your Day Job). Check out Minx’s bio here.

 

Cunning MinxHow do you see yourself as a catalyst for change?

I actually see myself less as a catalyst for change these days and more as a documentarian of the change that is going on around us. Polyamory is becoming mainstream, which is very exciting! More and more folks are becoming aware of the term, and fewer are associating it with Mormon cults and polygamy. We are seeing more profiles of poly folks on television with less sensationalism. The change is happening, and I am very excited to be poly in 2013!

Who or what was a catalyst for you?

The one who introduced me to polyamory was Graydancer, my first poly love and partner. The one who first invited me to speak at a conference was Alesia, at the poly-friendly sci-fi relax-a-con Conflation. The one who first showed me the extraordinary audience that Poly Weekly had was Steve Eley, founder of the Escape Pod podcast, when we first hosted Escape Pod/Poly Weekly joint meetups at Dragon*Con. The one who first invited me to speak at a sex-positive, non-poly-specific conference was Amber Rhea, founder of the Sex 2.0 conferences. And the ones who’ve kept me from quitting when I started working 50 hours a week for the startup were the fans, who kept writing and asking for advice, for meetups and to share their Happy Poly Moments!

What do you feel are some of the biggest challenges or concerns facing us in the field of sexuality right now?

Even though DOMA has been overturned, gay marriage is still only legal in 13 states. More and more teen girls are reporting sexual violence in their dating lives. Congress is still regulating women’s uteruses and making abortions harder to come by. Poly-identified people still have to hide their relationship structures from friends, families and employers for fear of judgment, persecution or loss of parental rights. We should absolutely take the time to celebrate the wins in our battles for sexual equality–and then gear up for the next fight.

What do you feel are some of the most important/valuable positive changes that have been made in the world of sexuality in the past year?

DOMA being overtuned was a huge win, and two more states legalized gay marriage. Also, the fact that the show Polyamory: Married and Dating was renewed for a new season with new poly groups is a very good sign that polyamory is hitting the mainstream.

Why do you feel it is important to bring the topic of your session, How to be a Sex Positive Educator (When You Still Love Your Day Job), to CatalystCon West?

My topic this year is a bit different from the ones I’ve presented in the past, which tend to focus either on polyamory, podcasting or social media, my biggest strengths. What I proposed this year came from an experience I had last year: in canoodling with some of my favorite sex-positive educators, I realized that I was one of the few presenters that didn’t educate full-time. And what’s more, I have no desire to educate full-time: I love my demanding day job and all its challenges and rewards. But I also feel that educating folks about polyamory and creating an online space where the polyamorous, monogamous and poly-curious can share ideas, questions and experiences is incredibly important. The attendees I spoke with were all starting their own projects and wondering how to juggle being a part-time educator with their full-time jobs. And since the best sessions come from topics that I myself struggle with, it made sense to craft a session designed to help people like me join the activist/educator ranks while still keeping the day jobs that they love.

Share one unknown (or little known) fact about yourself.

I was once kicked off a train in the middle of what was then Yugoslavia in the middle of the night.

 

Learn more about all our amazing speakers here. Register for CatalystCon West here.

Speaker Spotlight: Ashley Manta

 CCON West 2013, Speaker Spotlight  Comments Off on Speaker Spotlight: Ashley Manta
Aug 282013
 

Ashley Manta is presenting Does This Panel Make Me Look Fat?: Body Image and Sexuality. Check out Ashley’s bio here.

 

Ashley MantaHow do you see yourself as a catalyst for change?

I’ve had a lot of different life experiences. I’m a rape and child sexual abuse survivor, I have genital herpes, and I’ve had an eating disorder and struggled with body image. I think my openness and honesty about my experiences creates space for others to do the same. I believe that vulnerability is a vital part of human connection, and I try to model that willingness to be vulnerable.

Who or what was a catalyst for you?

In April of 2005, during my first year of college, I attended my first Take Back the Night rally. I didn’t intend to speak, just to go and support my fellow students. That night, I found myself disclosing my rape for the first time in public, to an audience of close to 400 people. I felt supported, I felt seen, and I felt relieved. It was that experience that made me realize that I love educating and sharing stories to raise awareness. That led me to start speaking out more about my experiences, and doing sexual assault awareness presentations for different organizations. Telling my story changed my life.

What do you feel are some of the biggest challenges or concerns facing us in the field of sexuality right now?

I think the biggest challenge in the field of sexuality is the pervasive sex negative culture by which we are surrounded. Everywhere you look, people are decrying marriage equality as “crimes against children,” arguing against comprehensive sexuality education, and shaming and ostracizing those who don’t fit in the heteronormative mold. The result of our sex negative culture is that the services that we provide as sexuality educators, counselors, and sex workers are not valued and are thus woefully underpaid (or illegal, in the case of sex workers). It’s difficult to find a full time job as a sex educator with benefits. Those jobs don’t really exist right now, except for with non-profit organizations, and those are few and far between.

What do you feel are some of the most important/valuable positive changes that have been made in the world of sexuality in the past year?

Watching DOMA get overturned was possibly one of the most joyous moments of my life. I remember sitting at work and reading the news, jumping up from my desk and doing a happy dance. Although there is still a long way to go in the fight for marriage equality, I appreciated the Supreme Court’s decision.

Why do you feel it is important to bring the topic of your session, Does This Panel Make Me Look Fat?: Body Image and Sexuality, to CatalystCon West?

It’s really important to discuss fat shaming and body image, because fat shaming does not just affect “fat people.” People of any size can feel fat or have trouble with body image, and it’s important to raise awareness so that we can begin to be more loving and supportive toward one another and ourselves. I have been 132lbs and I have been over 250lbs. I had times that I hated my body at both weights. We live in a culture that has a specific aesthetic ideal when it comes to our bodies, and we need to push back against that. This panel helps to raise awareness and start a dialogue about the way we see our bodies and the way we interact with the bodies of others.

Share one unknown (or little known) fact about yourself.

I love watching people get tattoos and piercings. I find it fascinating.

 

Learn more about all our amazing speakers here. Register for CatalystCon West here.

Speaker Spotlight: Danny Wylde

 CCON West 2013, Speaker Spotlight  Comments Off on Speaker Spotlight: Danny Wylde
Aug 262013
 

Danny Wylde is presenting The Politics of Producing Pleasure: Feminist Porn in Industry and Academe. Check out Danny’s bio here.

 

DannyWyldeHow do you see yourself as a catalyst for change?

I am a pornographic performer. Several years ago, I started to document my experiences in order to:
First, define what pornography is from a sex worker’s point of view.

Second, explore the ethics of porn production.

and

Third, open an honest dialog with consumers about how pornography effects those who watch it, and vice versa.

I believe this process – helped along by online dissemination – has some impact on the cultural perception of both sex workers and pornography itself.

Who or what was a catalyst for you?

The catalyst for my change in thought process regarding sex work and pornography was the privilege of my on-camera participation and the ability to meet a great many of those who now make up my community.

What do you feel are some of the biggest challenges or concerns facing us in the field of sexuality right now?

I think there is a problem with classification/simplification that tends to misrepresent an entire culture. Such as when people make claims that pornography is about something specific – especially with negative connotation. Sexuality (including representations of sexuality) is never uniform. To say so is to negate our multi-faceted, human experience. This has far-reaching consequences, particularly in terms of censorship and discrimination.

What do you feel are some of the most important/valuable positive changes that have been made in the world of sexuality in the past year?

I believe the traction of the Feminist Porn Movement both within the academic and public sphere has been a great step forward. It allows us to move past adversarial conversations regarding porn, and into discussions on how representations of sexuality can make up positive experiences in our lives.

Why do you feel it is important to bring the topic of your session, The Politics of Producing Pleasure: Feminist Porn in Industry and Academe, to CatalystCon West?

I feel it’s important to bring Feminist Porn to CatalystCon West because the future of my industry may rely on a public perception of pornography as a valuable contribution to society.

Share one unknown (or little known) fact about yourself.

I am addicted to Boba.

 

Learn more about all our amazing speakers here. Register for CatalystCon West here.

Speaker Spotlight: Marije Janssen

 CCON West 2013, Speaker Spotlight  Comments Off on Speaker Spotlight: Marije Janssen
Aug 222013
 

Marije Janssen is presenting From Slow Sex to Porna – A 21st Century Sexual Revolution in the Lowlands. Check out Marije’s bio here.

 

Marije JanssenHow do you see yourself as a catalyst for change?

I see myself as a catalyst for change in the topics I try to bring to the foreground, ranging from sexual education to feminist porn to sex worker rights. My strategies are diverse: by organizing events as screenings, debates and festivals I try to create spaces where people feel safe to explore, experiment and share their ideas, thoughts and desires. At the same time I try to bring different groups and people together to create more open dialogues about sexuality in all its facets, to listen and learn from each other. Recently a journalist called me a sex-idealist, and I think she’s right. A realistic idealist.

Who or what was a catalyst for you?

There have been many catalysts in my life and I’m so thankful to having met so many amazing, inspiring people sharing their thoughts, theories, dreams and struggles. Like Sadie Lune, Wendy Delorme, Gala Vanting, my sister, the sex workers I’ve worked with. So many people who dared to confront the norm and follow their own path.

But the most powerful catalyst has been the Art & Politics of Netporn Conference in Amsterdam in 2006. I was still a research intern at the time, writing my thesis on feminist pornography online. This conference was the first time I was surrounded by people exploring sexuality and pornography. It was an amazing event not just for me but for all of the participants, who come from all over the world. It was one of the very (if not the actual) first academic/activist/artistic conference dedicated to internet pornography and all the possibilities it offered. It triggered my career.

What do you feel are some of the biggest challenges or concerns facing us in the field of sexuality right now?

Increasing conservative powers and anti-gay violence and politics around the world.

What do you feel are some of the most important/valuable positive changes that have been made in the world of sexuality in the past year?

The academic and media-attention for feminist pornography, with the Feminist Porn Book and the Feminist Porn Conference. I was extremely impressed when I attended the conference in Toronto this spring. I would never have dreamed that feminist pornography would develop in this way when I wrote my own thesis in 2006. Another part, which is also happening in the Netherlands is the growing attention for the position of men in the discussion about sexuality. How do we perceive masculinity and male sexuality? What are the struggles men have to deal with? I think it’s extremely important to include men in the ‘fight’.

Why do you feel it is important to bring the topic of your session, From Slow Sex to Porna – A 21st Century Sexual Revolution in the Lowlands, to CatalystCon West?

My topic will be a bit more ‘utopic’ (is this an actual term?), I’m dreaming big dreams of a new sexual revolution. Some people think it’s unrealistic and absurd, but in my belief, many ingredients are there to make it happen and it’s up to us to create a change, despite and because of the conservative notions in politics and society. Not just in the US, but also in a country like the Netherlands.

Share one unknown (or little known) fact about yourself.

I fancy Darth Vader.

 

Learn more about all our amazing speakers here. Register for CatalystCon West here.

Speaker Spotlight: Xochiquetzal Duti Odinsdottir

 CCON West 2013, Speaker Spotlight  Comments Off on Speaker Spotlight: Xochiquetzal Duti Odinsdottir
Aug 192013
 

Xochiquetzal Duti Odinsdottir is presenting But Wait, There’s More! Exploring the Intersection of Race, Class, Ability and Sexuality and Desire. Check out Xochiquetzal’s bio here.

 

Xochiquetzal Duti OdinsdottirHow do you see yourself as a catalyst for change?

I think the key aspect of myself that makes me a catalyst is that I can’t stay still when I see something that needs to be challenged. It’s a privilege to live in a country that still allows for dissension even when voices are raised. I try to stand for what I believe is right and needs fixing, I work hard to ask the questions that need answers and provide space and resources for those who are willing to ask the very same of themselves.

Who or what was a catalyst for you?

My grandfather’s work with the early formation of the United Farm Worker’s, my upbringing as a person proud of her heritage and her country (despite it’s sometimes lack of respect for me) and my insistence in equity and equality among all motivate and push me for more, each and every time the same issues come around.

What do you feel are some of the biggest challenges or concerns facing us in the field of sexuality right now?

Right now, we’re seeing an explosion of information being disseminated, but I’m not seeing that information being checked for quality. We want to be able to talk to people who are interested in new and different avenues to explore their sexuality and find authenticity within niche communities, but there is a glut of information with no checks for accuracy. So we have half-truths floating around that someone considers canonical when that isn’t the case, and we don’t do a very good job of separating the ‘wheat’ from the ‘chaff’, so to speak.

What do you feel are some of the most important/valuable positive changes that have been made in the world of sexuality in the past year?

One of the key components to emerge in recent years is the willingness to embrace sexuality as another facet of the individual instead of as a thing apart from all the identifiers a person may use. We don’t leave our sexuality out of the way in a conversation about race, gender, ability, because these are all things that come into play when we are talking about taking our sexuality into our hands. These different facets are all part of what society sees, not just as pieces but as the sum of ourselves.

Why do you feel it is important to bring the topic of your session, But Wait, There’s More! Exploring the Intersection of Race, Class, Ability and Sexuality and Desire, to CatalystCon West?

We’ve reached a point in human sexuality where the ability to engage one another is happening at a level and rate we could not have imagined. Along that parallel, we are also coming into contact with people whose experience is a sharp contrast to our own and while we may feel attracted, we’re not sure if we are able to engage each other in a way that recognizes and honors those differences without creating discomfort or making a social faux pas. When we look at the entirety of a person (their ability, their past, their experiences as people from different backgrounds, etc.) we can learn more about ourselves; our wants and desires and still have a good time. But we have to be willing to engage in dialogue to do so, this presentation is hopefully going to help break through some of the trepidation people may have.

Share one unknown (or little known) fact about yourself.

I’m a voracious reader across a wide range of genres.

 

Learn more about all our amazing speakers here. Register for CatalystCon West here.

Speaker Spotlight: Davis

 CCON West 2013, Speaker Spotlight  Comments Off on Speaker Spotlight: Davis
Aug 122013
 

Davis is presenting  Top 10 Myths About Business (and the Truth). Check out Davis’s bio here.

 

davisHow do you see yourself as a catalyst for change?

I work unconventionally in a traditionally conventional industry, the law. I have many unconventional clients, choose to office from a coworking space rather than a traditional office, and embrace a lot of innovative techniques in my practice, including flat fee monthly billing. All of this is hopefully helping to change the way people think about lawyers and the role than can play in the team of folks that help move a business to the next level.

Who or what was a catalyst for you?

My clients have always been my biggest catalysts for change. Ever since I began practicing on my own (a move which was inspired by the bravery of my clients who had often made a similar leap!), I have tried to listen to what my clients want and need, and to adopt those things as part of my business. This has led to expanding Sexquire from solely legal work to bookkeeping, tax preparation and other services, all in response to suggestions from clients.

What do you feel are some of the biggest challenges or concerns facing us in the field of sexuality right now?

Ourselves. Sure, there are lots of forces working to undermine or completely shut down any aspects of sexuality education or freedom, but I think the biggest challenges in this industry come from within, and generally from the smaller businesses. I have witnessed so much infighting, ridiculous attempts to stop so-called “competitors” from advancing new ideas and just general discord internally in the industry that sometimes I lose hope that we will ever find a way to all work together. However, there are always new folks getting into the industry, so maybe someone new will find a way to get everyone working together!

What do you feel are some of the most important/valuable positive changes that have been made in the world of sexuality in the past year?

I’m glad to see people continuing the fight against the stereotype that porn can not come from a feminist perspective, or that it’s inherently bad for women. It’s hard to believe we’re still having this conversation in 2013, but I’m glad intelligent folks are at the forefront of this decade’s defense of pornography.

Why do you feel it is important to bring this topic [the topic of your session] to CatalystCon West?

When starting (or running) a business in the field of sexuality, having professional service providers give you serious answers or work with you is often one of the biggest challenges. Whenever I have a chance to bring information I’ve amassed over a decade of involvement with sex-related businesses to those thinking of starting or currently running one, I think it’s important. Sometimes the best information from sessions like this one come from the audience and their experiences, so I like providing a place for those conversations as well.

Share one unknown (or little known) fact about yourself.

When I was 7 I scratched a lottery ticket and won $5000.

 

Learn more about all our amazing speakers here. Register for CatalystCon West here.

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