Mar 092014
 

Red Emma‘s will be selling books at CatalystCon East, including several titles by some of our speakers and we have arranged to hold book signings as a special treat for our attendees. The signings will take place in the Washington Room Exhibitor Hall.

Saturday, March 15:

10:15am – Melissa Gira Grant

11:45am – Dr. Yvonne Fulbright & Rachel Kramer Bussel

1:15pm – Dr. Melanie Davis & Mona Darling

Sunday, March 17:

10:15 – Dr. Carol Queen & Dr. Robert Morgan Lawrence

11:45am – Tristan Taormino

1:15 – Mo Beasley & Minister L. Renair Amin Covington

*Schedule is subject to change

Mar 092014
 

Ruby Ryder is presenting The “Ass Panel”: The Ins and Outs of Anal Pleasure. Check out Ruby’s bio here.
Ruby Ryder

1. How do you see yourself as a catalyst for change?

I teach about subject that is fairly taboo outside the rarefied walls of CatalystCon and sex geek circles; pegging. I engage regular people in conversation about heterosexual strap-on sex, support their desire for it and attempt to normalize it so that pegging is just one more incredibly pleasurable thing in their sexual treasure chest of choices.

2. Who or what was a catalyst for you?

The men who are brave enough to pursue their desires for pegging really do inspire me every day! You guys rock.

3. What do you feel are some of the biggest challenges or concerns facing us in the field of sexuality right now?

The two biggest challenges I feel are first, sex work being illegal and second, sex education in schools being worse than laughable – it’s actually harmful in a lot of places. In a perfect world sex work is legal and sex workers have protection and respect. In perfect schools, sex education is very informative, accurate and teaches about pleasure as well as safety and protection.

4. What do you feel are some of the most important/valuable positive changes that have been made in the world of sexuality in the past year?

Hands down the Supreme Court decision on DOMA and Prop 8. Until everyone is automatically granted the right to love and marry whomever they want all across the United States, we have more work to do. Those SCOTUS decisions were tremendous victories.

5. Why do you feel it is important to bring this topic The “Ass Panel”: The Ins and Outs of Anal Pleasure to CatalystCon East?

I feel the topic of pegging and prostate pleasure is a much misunderstood sleeper in the world of sexuality. Not only are there health benefits, but the potential for reviving sexually stale partnerships, men discovering orgasms equivalent to women’s G-spot orgasms, multiple orgasms and a marked deepening of a couple’s intimacy is without compare.

6. Share one unknown (or little known) fact about yourself.

I live on a 12 acre horse ranch where the street lights are far away and I can see all the stars at night. In the distance I hear horses whinnying occasionally at all hours of the night and day.

Learn more about all our amazing speakers here

Mar 082014
 

Dr. Yvonne Fulbright is presenting The Hijacking of Healthy Sexuality. Check out Dr. Fulbright’s bio here.
Yvonne Fulbright

1. How do you see yourself as a catalyst for change?
My mission as a sexuality educator has been simple: to equip people with the information, skills and tools they need to make their own decisions, within their own value system, about sexuality-related matters. A major message I try to convey is that to be sexual is healthy and natural – something so many in our society still don’t grasp or support. I stand on the shoulders of giants in the field of comprehensive sexuality education, continuing their work to change the way we handle sexuality in our society, e.g., making it less taboo and shameful. This has included taking on efforts that others wouldn’t dare touch, like penning a sex column for Foxnews.com and getting behind my own line of sexual enhancement products.

2. Who or what was a catalyst for you?
When I moved to the States (from Iceland) at 10-years-old, I recognized the mishandling of sexuality matters almost immediately. As the first girl in my class hit puberty, I received lots of unwanted attention and felt scrutinized by peers’ parents, fearful that their child was next. In 6th grade, I was given the opportunity, for a class project, to give a 5-minute presentation on the female reproductive system, conception and menstruation. As I spoke, using a model of the female reproductive system made out of junk, my classmates’ eyes were the size of saucers. I realized that I was comfortable with something many aren’t. Never having heard of Dr. Ruth or the field of sexuality education, I knew that teaching others about sex was something I had to do more of as an adult.

3. What do you feel are some of the biggest challenges or concerns facing us in the field of sexuality right now?
In a nutshell: Far Right conservatives are still enemy #1 when it comes to any sex ed and sexual and reproductive health efforts, including funding for such. What we saw take place last election year highlights the fact that women are still considered second class citizens in this country, which is very related to a lot of the issues that sexuality educators take on daily.

4. What do you feel are some of the most important/valuable positive changes that have been made in the world of sexuality in the past year?

Sexual wellness products have become less taboo in the marketplace, with more stores recognizing that they need to carry certain products in enabling customers to take care of their sexual and reproductive health. The sexual wellness industry is booming more than ever, and will only get bigger, enabling us to educate more people, who otherwise wouldn’t get information, about healthy sexuality.

5. Why do you feel it is important to bring this topic The Hijacking of Healthy Sexuality to CatalystCon East?
I pitched the “Hijacking of Healthy Sexuality” topic because I’ve been concerned about who has had the mic (in the media) in steering conversations around sexuality. Often, there’s a personal agenda, e.g., self-promotion, or a business one, e.g., the pharmaceutical and porn industries standing to make tons of money, with the information that’s disseminated often misguided, based on personal values vs. facts, and/or incomplete. While people have greater access to sexuality resources than ever, a number of those resources are problematic, e.g., people with zero creds in sex ed. People, especially parents, need better guidance when it comes to scrutinizing their resources and learning how to communicate their values about healthy sexuality to their families.

6. Share one unknown (or little known) fact about yourself.
For as public as I’ve been in my sexuality education efforts, I’m a very private person (it’s the Icelander in me).

 

Learn more about all of our amazing speakers here.

Mar 072014
 

Melanie Davis is presenting Shattering Assumptions about Sex and Aging. Check out Melanie’s bio here.
Melanie Davis

1. How do you see yourself as a catalyst for change?

As co-president of the Sexuality and Aging Consortium, I’m able to call attention to the need for sexuality education, healthcare, and advocacy related to older adults’ sexualities and expression. As this organization grows, we’re fostering change by training professionals, paraprofessionals, students and consumers. It’s an honor to be a leader in this area of specialty.

2. Who or what was a catalyst for you?

My experiences as a Planned Parenthood patient educator and sex educator for my church inspired me to earn my PhD in Human Sexuality Education at Widener University and switch careers from marketing to sexuality education.

3. What do you feel are some of the biggest challenges or concerns facing us in the field of sexuality right now?

The continuing onslaught from sex-negative groups with the money and power to convert harmful agendas into legislation.

4. What do you feel are some of the most important/valuable positive changes that have been made in the world of sexuality in the past year?

Increasing numbers of states recognizing marriage equality and greater numbers of people entering the sexuality education field.

5. Why do you feel it is important to bring this topic Shattering Assumptions about Sex and Aging to CatalystCon East?

I’ll be addressing age-related sexual privilege, i.e., the assumption that sexual attraction, interest, and pleasure aren’t appropriate for people over middle age. It behooves us to honor the sexuality of older adults and to ensure that sexual rights and privileges remain everyone’s to enjoy throughout their lifespan.

6. Share one unknown (or little known) fact about yourself.

My husband and I took first prize in a ballroom dance competition’s “Over Age 40 Paso Doble Show Dance” category. We were the only competitors, but still…

Learn more about all our amazing speakers here

Mar 072014
 

Mo Beasley is presenting PRIDE & Prejudice – Confronting Homophobia in Communities of Color. Check out Mo’s bio here.
Mo Beasley

1. How do you see yourself as a catalyst for change?

I pose the more challenging questions of life and sexuality through speaking, teaching, and live performance. Questions such as, “how do you re-define, manhood, culture, sexuality…existence for the 21st Century and beyond?”

2. Who or what was a catalyst for you?

I have 3 significant catalyst that have lead me to places like CatalystCon.

Being a teen cast member of a Planned Parenthood theater troupe (Y.E.T. Youth Expression Theater) was a catalyst that showed me the power of art as change. “Thank you for showing me suicide is not an option”, was an anonymous note left on a road box after one of our shows. That moment changed my life. Lead me down this road of art and activism as my way life. As a way to enrich and enlighten others.
A 6’7″ gay white cowboy from Kansas who was a mentor of mine after graduating college with a theater degree, was also a catalyst for me. He taught me the art of Love as action while teaching me to stage manage shows from regional theater to Broadway. We have a standing deal to check our respective communities when they use the “N” or “F” word in our presence. “Where’s the Love in it?” was the question he always asked me when I was about to blast someone for fucking up on the job or attacking me in my personal life. Dr. King and Ghandi were guiding forces in his life and work. I adopted their techniques by association.
My “Uncle Rueben” a street corner philosopher/hustler/wise man/father-figure/no good nigga who scared me straight when I attempted to adopt the drug trade as a career. “You Don’t belong out here in these streets. You’re talented. You supposed to do something else. Go do it!! …before I cave in your chest!” I’m here at CatalystCon because of his belief in me.

3. What do you feel are some of the biggest challenges or concerns facing us in the field of sexuality right now?

Ignorance is, and will always be, our biggest challenge. Patriarchy runs a close second; OR as the seed of ignorance. Anything counter to the sexual acceptance of Men of Power and Privilege is demonized in western, and eastern society.

4. What do you feel are some of the most important/valuable positive changes that have been made in the world of sexuality in the past year?
13 states legalizing gay marriage
Athletes coming out of the closet, publicly.

5. Why do you feel it is important to bring this topic PRIDE & Prejudice – Confronting Homophobia in Communities of Color to CatalystCon East?

The issue of Homophobia in communities of color is an urgent issue that lives way under the radar of sexuality rights and activism. Black and Hispanics make up the majority of poor people in America and their LGBTQ children are even poorer because they are cast out of their homes/families when their sexuality is revealed, or uncovered. Our homosexual family members are being killed and persecuted in alarming numbers. Way too often its members of their own family. We MUST shed the brightest light on this problem, in hopes of being a catalyst for greater acceptance.

6. Share one unknown (or little known) fact about yourself

I was raised as one of Jehovah’s Witnesses. With my oratory and literary skills, my family thoroughly expected me to become an Elder in the faith. My mother continues to pray away that “sex stuff”, and support of gays.

Learn more about all our amazing speakers here

Mar 062014
 

Steve Gustafson is presenting Why is the Media Afraid of Sex? Check out Steve’s bio here.
 

Steve Gustafson

1. How do you see yourself as a catalyst for change?
I’m very active in a number of areas. Besides writing for a couple of mainstream websites, I run a suicide prevention awareness non-profit and a small social media management company. I am constantly networking and meeting people who are open to fresh ideas and engaging in conversation on how to better our lives. I’m very open in my beliefs and the need to educate myself and those around me. I find that talking one-on-one and in small groups goes farther in educating someone you know over sending an email with a link and saying, “Read this.” I have a number of friends who are closeted about their sexual beliefs and I see that frustration on their part comes from outdated traditions set by their family or religious upbringing. Everyone is a catalyst for change. It’s important to be a catalyst for POSITIVE change.

2. Who or what was a catalyst for you?
I’ll always say my family. We’re not perfect but they support me in all I do, even when they might not understand or agree. My parents stressed the importance of treating others fairly and not being quick to judge. They would tell me that you might not know someone’s situation and usually things are not what they seem. My mom works at a hospital and I remember coming to her early on with questions about sex and she never made me feel weird or uncomfortable about it. That’s stuck with me and something I want to pass on to others.

3. What do you feel are some of the biggest challenges or concerns facing us in the field of sexuality right now?
That it’s bad to talk about sex. So simple to target but so hard to overcome. Society has no problem making sex into a punchline but will quickly shy away from anything that would make them confront their beliefs. Also, politicians who are attempting to regulate our sex lives. Hidden behind their hypocrisy and shame are their buried issues that they refuse to acknowledge and we’re the ones to pay for it. We’re too complacent in allowing politicians, who are supposed to represent us, be swayed by the sexually frustrated, brainwashed minority.

4. What do you feel are some of the most important/valuable positive changes that have been made in the world of sexuality in the past year?
The expansion of sex sections in the media. A quick scan of some of the major news sites will reveal a sex/lifestyle section. That’s a start. We need to continue the momentum and add more positive voices to that. As the sex positive movement moves forward, I see more representatives coming out to voice their opinions and that’s something I’m excited about. Once that happens, I expect more and more people will talk about and educate themselves in a friendly and inviting environment. That includes those friends, neighbors, and co-workers who might THINK like we do but are afraid to SAY anything out of fear of being labelled.

5. Why do you feel it is important to bring this topic Why is the Media Afraid of Sex? to CatalystCon East?
The media is everywhere and shapes us more than we are willing to admit. This influence bleeds into social media as well. A quick look at your Facebook timeline or Twitter feed will show a number of links to news sites with stories from the negative to the inspiring. When something happens, the media is more focused on being first over being right. That stretches to sex. A story that covers sex, sex workers, sex studies, or sex education will always carry a headline that’s either cliched or so over-the-top, no one takes it serious. The media is in a tough spot, They need hits on their pages to get advertisers but they can’t alienate their readership or the ones buying ad space. A very vocal, but small, group of people can sway them over a story and that’s what we have to overcome. People who write sex positive blogs are usually forced to do so with a false name out of fear of being judged and punished. There’s something seriously wrong about that. I want to push forward and find ways to support positive media coverage of sex and remove that stigma.

6. Share one unknown (or little known) fact about yourself.
Besides still having a dream to appear in the pages of ‘Playgirl’? I was in an episode of “Forbidden’ on the ID Channel. That part isn’t unknown. What IS unknown: It was a bedroom scene and I didn’t want to look bad in front of the cameras so I stuffed 2 socks down my boxer
shorts. See, you can’t always believe what you see on TV!

 

Learn more about all our amazing speakers here. Register for CatalystCon East here.

Mar 052014
 

Sonya Barnett is presenting Sexual Art & Engagement: How to Build Sex Positivity in Communities. Check out Sonya’s bio here.
Sonya Barnett

1. How do you see yourself as a catalyst for change?
I’m lucky enough to be in a position where my voice can be heard, at least by a few people. Through The Keyhole Sessions and SlutWalk, I’ve facilitated an amazing community of sex-positive people who have arrived from many different viewpoints and backgrounds, and are ready to listen with open minds and share new information. That information sharing is vital for change.

2. Who or what was a catalyst for you?
I co-founded a movement called SlutWalk that was set up to combat victim-blaming in Toronto’s police & judicial services. We thought that it would be a small event, but when it turned into an international movement, I realized just how important it is to speak out about injustices, not just tout sex positivity. It wasn’t long before I left my day job as an Art Director and focused all my attention on furthering causes that champion anything on sexuality, diversity and education.

3. What do you feel are some of the biggest challenges or concerns facing us in the field of sexuality right now?
Government is still deferring to religious pushback when it comes to properly educating youth on sexuality, relationships and our ever-evolving cultures. Though there are many that are pursuing better curricula in schools, there is the constant fight against the wave of religious and “moral” organizations that want to keep us in the 19th century.

4. What do you feel are some of the most important/valuable positive changes that have been made in the world of sexuality in the past year?
I’ve seen an amazing increase in the presence of sex educators from various fields. Social Media has been a huge help in introducing people and topics to a wider public sphere. When people in need see that there are multiple outlets to access, it’s a good step toward expanding knowledge and acceptance.

5. Why do you feel it is important to bring this topic Sexual Art & Engagement: How to Build Sex Positivity in Communities to CatalystCon East?
When I started The Keyhole Sessions, it was to fill a creative void in my own life, mixed with enough sexuality that would make me happy, since I wasn’t finding it anywhere else. What I didn’t expect was the community that built around the sessions, and how so many people were affected by being able to express themselves or satisfy a curiosity that wasn’t then clouded with judgement. By virtue of creating a safe space for such expression, people began learning from us and from each other, and then sharing what they learned with others outside of TKS. When people started coming to me for more personal questions about sex, diversity, gender, education, and relationships, I realized that creating such a space is a great first step in fostering sex positivity in expanded communities.

6. Share one unknown (or little known) fact about yourself.
I got kicked off an island nation for being a rebel.

Learn more about all our amazing speakers here

Mar 042014
 

Ashley Manta is presenting Living With An STI. Check out Ashley’s bio here.
Ashley Mantra

1. How do you see yourself as a catalyst for change?
Drawing inspiration from the work of Brene Brown, I try to model vulnerability and transparency in my life. I share my personal triumphs and struggles in the hopes that by sharing my story, I will give permission to others to share theirs. I try to be, as Kate McCombs would say, a “beacon of permission.” I believe that vulnerability is the key to connection, and that by being authentically and unapologetically ourselves, we can have rich relationships with one another.

2. Who or what was a catalyst for you?

Coming to CatalystCon East last year was a catalyst for me. I had been doing sexuality education for almost 6 years at that point, but never as part of the community. I went there not knowing a single person and came away with great friendships and a solid professional network. That network has grown exponentially over the past year, and I am thrilled to be going back to CatalystCon East this year as a presenter. Being part of this community has given me the courage to “come out” about having genital herpes, the opportunity to meet people who have been my professional heroes for years, and the confidence to put myself out there professionally in ways I didn’t think were possible this time last year. Tristan Taormino’s Sex Educator Boot Camp was especially vital in developing myself as a business owner.

3. What do you feel are some of the biggest challenges or concerns facing us in the field of sexuality right now?

I think anytime you have a community of people, be it sex positive, progressives, etc. you have the possibility of falling victim to the “curse of knowledge” and forgetting that not everyone has the same education, background, and opportunities for nuanced understanding that we have. We all started out as beginners at one point or another, perhaps made mistakes or had uninformed opinions, and I think it’s important that we remember that not everyone is as far along as we are. Rather than either assuming that everyone is on the same page or chastising those who may not be as informed as we are, we need to identify “teachable moments” and encourage people to learn and grow and ask questions.

4. What do you feel are some of the most important/valuable positive changes that have been made in the world of sexuality in the past year?
I think Feminist Porn really came into the spotlight this past year. With the publishing of the Feminist Porn Book, the first ever Feminist Porn Conference, the establishment of a Porn Studies academic journal, and the inclusion of a Feminist Porn panel at mainstream adult industry event XBiz360, there have been many leaps forward for the Feminist Porn movement.

5. Why do you feel it is important to bring the topic of Living With An STI to CatalystCon East?

Even in our face paced, tech-savvy, information overloaded world, most people are still operating with the understanding of STIs that they learned in high school. There is so much stigma surrounding STIs and people who contract them, right down to our vernacular: “I got tested last week and I’m clean.” The clean/dirty dichotomy is one of the many things we’ll be touching on in our panel, but suffice to say it is incredibly problematic and stigmatizing to refer to someone with an STI as “dirty.” I hope that by starting the conversation with fellow sex positive professionals, this information will disseminate into mainstream conversations.

6. Share one unknown (or little known) fact about yourself.

I used to have horrific stage fright. I hated public speaking and would break out in hives every time I had to get up in front of people and give a presentation. I would wear turtleneck sweaters anytime I had to speak in front of my class in high school so that people wouldn’t be able to see them.

 

Learn more about all our amazing speakers here

Mar 032014
 

Epiphora is presenting The Business of Blogging About Sex. Check out Epiphora’s bio here.
Epiphora

1. How do you see yourself as a catalyst for change?
I tell the truth. Sometimes, just that is enough—especially in the sex toy reviewing scene. People do crazy things when they’re sent free products! But I am not swayed. I write for my readers, not for the companies. I fight against misinformation, ignorance, and sugarcoating. I fight against toxic jelly toys and the idea that sex toys are threatening. I fight for pleasure and for folks to take control of their sexual happiness. It’s a small thing, to some people, but to me it’s an important thing.

2. Who or what was a catalyst for you?
Taking my first gender studies class in college. It was a whole new world. That was around the same time that I started reviewing sex toys, so my love for writing and sexuality converged perfectly. You better believe I wrote academic papers about sex toy usage and feminist porn.

Telling my parents about my field of work was also a turning point. I was terrified to do that. I had to get over my fear that everyone would be ashamed of me writing about sex. Now I leave dildos all around my apartment and my mom attends workshops with me.

3. What do you feel are some of the biggest challenges or concerns facing us in the field of sexuality right now?
Sadly, we are still fighting for the simple recognition that our work holds value. And we are continually lumped in with “obscene” and terrible things—just look at how Terms of Service statements on websites put adult content in the same sentence with violence. Facebook suspended my fan page once because there was a picture of sex toys on it, yet horrific misogynist pages aren’t taken down. We have some messed up priorities in this country.

4. Why do you feel it is important to bring this topic The Business of Blogging About Sex. to CatalystCon East?
There’s a lot that goes into sex blogging, at least if you take it seriously and hope to make some money from it. Our panel will be all about blogging with business sense. I’ll be talking about how to procure free products for review, join affiliate programs (and harness the power of affiliate links), accept paid banner ads, and use social media to your advantage. This is stuff that I wasn’t familiar with when I started blogging, so I’m excited to teach others what I’ve learned.

5. Share one unknown (or little known) fact about yourself.
I tried to start a food/fitness blog a few years back after I lost 100 pounds. That didn’t last.

 

Learn more about all our amazing speakers here. Register for CatalystCon East here.

Announcing a Special Fundraiser March 13 to Benefit The Center for Sex & Culture

 CCON East, CCON East 2014, Special Event  Comments Off on Announcing a Special Fundraiser March 13 to Benefit The Center for Sex & Culture
Feb 272014
 

“THE CENTER FOR SEX & CULTURE: TRAVELING” MAKES AN APPEARANCE AT CATALYSTCON

Washington DC-area Sex Conference Promises “Exceptional Conversations,” Hosts CSC Benefit Evening

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

CSC

Two extraordinary organizations that promote sex education and lively, sophisticated discussions about sex and culture will join forces next month to entertain, inform, and raise funds. CatalystCon, North America’s most unique sexuality conference, welcomes San Francisco’s Center for Sex & Culture to the East Coast and hosts a benefit evening of performance and more on behalf of the West Coast nonprofit. This event is open to the public (18+), not only attendees of the conference.

The CSC benefit, “Center for Sex & Culture: Traveling,” launches the conference on March 13th. Featuring performances from renowned sex educator Ducky DooLittle and CSC founder Dr. Carol Queen and hosted by CSC co-founder Dr. Robert Morgan Lawrence, the event also offers an opportunity for attendees to peruse or purchase Safe Sex Bang, CSC’s first publication–a full-color catalog of the Center’s recent show of HIV/AIDS safer sex posters from the ’80s and beyond. More detail about SSB below.

Carol Queen will present an excerpt of her solo performance, “Peep Show,” about her time working as a “real live nude girl” at San Francisco’s notorious Lusty Lady theater. In it, she brings her audience backstage and into the “talk booth” of the historic peep show, which closed last year after several years as a union house and later as a worker-owned cooperative. Meet her co-workers and customers in this special, surprising, intimate and funny tour. Carol is the author of Exhibitionism for the ShyReal Live Nude Girl, and The Leather Daddy and the Femme; she has edited many other books about sex and eroticism.

Ducky Doolittle will perform her own peep show tales; while Carol held down the fort in San Francisco, at the tender age of 19 Ducky was having adventures at Show Follies on the other side of the continent. Her insights about the thousands of men she saw there–and the way the other peep show girls helped her learn the ropes and grow up–will amaze the civilians and make other former sex workers nod in recognition. Ducky is the author of Sex With The Lights On: 200 Illuminating Sex Questions Answered and is currently the Education Coordinator for the New York Academy of Sex Education. She is also the Education Coordinator for adult retailer Tantus Inc.

EVENT IN BRIEF:

What: Center for Sex & Culture: Traveling at CatalystCon — a benefit for CSC

When: Thursday, March 13, 2014, 8pm

Where: CrystalCity Hilton – Commonwealth Ballroom

How much: Suggested $10-50 donation; no one turned away for lack of funds

ABOUT THE CENTER FOR SEX & CULTURE:

Founded by sexologists Carol Queen and Robert Morgan Lawrence in 2000, the Best of the Bay- winning nonprofit Center for Sex & Culture houses a library, gallery, and archive, and hosts sex education and cultural events. Its mission is to provide judgment-free education and other resources to audiences across the sexual and gender spectrum; and to research and disseminate factual information, framing and informing issues of public policy and public health.  CSC is on Facebook and tweets at @CentrSexCulture; director Carol Queen tweets at @CarolQueen.

ABOUT SAFE SEX BANG:

The exhibition catalog for SAFE SEX BANG: The Buzz Bense Collection of Safe Sex Posters marks the Center for Sex & Culture’s first publishing venture. Bense collected and produced safe/r sex posters aimed at members of the queer community since the mid-1980s. On December 1, 2011 –to mark the occasion of annual World AIDS Day– Bense donated to CSC his collection of 150+ unique posters. Circulated at a moment when the queer community experienced the initial ravages brought on by the HIV/AIDS epidemic, these posters comprise a striking aesthetic collection of graphically innovative design that explicitly visualizes diverse LGBT communities and safe/r sex activism.

SAFE SEX BANG showcases images spanning from 1982 into the 2000s, from San Francisco to New York City and internationally from Australia, Germany, Denmark, and Canada. Highlights of the exhibition and catalog include the “Play Fair!” brochure produced by the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence in 1982, considered “the first queer positive, safer-sex pamphlet;” six bus shelter posters produced by the San Francisco AIDS Foundation and STOP AIDS Project that demand attention through their large-scale format; four powerful posters from the Brothers Network, a San Francisco based organization aimed at empowering and educating gay and transgender members of the African-American community; and five seductively colorful posters designed by the Australian artist David McDiarmid, examples of which are included in the collection of the National Gallery of Victoria. The double entendre of the SAFE SEX BANG exhibition title speaks to the means through which many of the posters impart their message of prevention: as sex-positive images of queer sexuality that have both an advertising immediacy and an informative sense of impact.

The catalog is 9 X 12 inches of full color pages with 50 illustrations, including text contributions from Dr. Carol Queen, Alex Fialho, Buzz Bense and Dorian Katz. Cost is $20.